[globaloutlookDH-l] When citing emails, do people silently correct typos?

Daniel O'Donnell daniel.odonnell at uleth.ca
Mon Feb 3 18:26:50 MST 2014


This is a very good point! As an Anglo-Saxonist, I'm more used to 
dealing with dead people, and they don't seem to care--or at least 
they've never complained!


On 14-02-03 01:49 PM, Bordalejo, Barbara wrote:
> Here you raise an important issue about language, specifically about 
> communicating in a non-native language. Yes, [sic] is offensive and it 
> is often used as a weapon: an author who corrects the scholar he or 
> she is quoting, might think this to be proof of superiority.
>
> It is true that I would be mortified if any of the quirks that can be 
> found in my written English were to be exposed as proof of my general 
> incompetence. As I write this, I wonder if my prepositions are right, 
> but also if my tone is adequate and whether this message contributes 
> to the discussion. However, I suspect that I would be equally 
> distressed (or perhaps more distressed) if anyone found mistakes in my 
> Spanish.
>
> Part of the goal of GO::DH, at least in my mind, should be to fight 
> against the prejudices exhibited by native speakers of all languages 
> against those who are less proficient. After all, those making 
> non-native mistakes in English can, at least, speak one other 
> language. But we also should keep in mind that consideration for 
> others, which includes the opportunity to correct themselves, is one 
> of the most important qualities in a human being and proof of ethical 
> soundness in a researcher.
>
>
> BB
>
> On 3 Feb 2014, at 14:30, Ernesto Priego <efpriego at gmail.com 
> <mailto:efpriego at gmail.com>> wrote:
>
>> Dear all,
>>
>> A final comment from me on this. I promise.
>>
>> I'd say that "public" and "private" are not clear-cut categories. 
>> There's room for complexity and exceptions. I understand that's a can 
>> of worms that might go beyond the scope of this (now clearly 
>> fully-citeable) discussion.
>>
>> As Isabel says a (sic) would be offensive.
>>
>> If something I quickly typed on the train (like this message right 
>> now) were to be cited in an academic paper about writing in English 
>> (a paper authored by a native English speaker addressing a majority 
>> of native English-speaking colleagues) I would be most-distressed to 
>> be exhibited making mistakes of any type. I'd much rather be asked 
>> directly so I can explain explain myself better.
>>
>> Then again that's just me.
>>
>> Best regards,
>>
>> Sent from my mobile
>>
>> On Feb 3, 2014 7:26 PM, "igalina" <igalina at unam.mx 
>> <mailto:igalina at unam.mx>> wrote:
>>
>>     Dear Dan,
>>     You have posed a most interesting question. Although I agree that
>>     writing to the person informing them that you want to quote them
>>     would be polite I must say that I too assume that when I write on
>>     a discussion list, it is public (unless specifically closed).
>>     Especially if you are going to be citing lots of different people
>>     writing to each person and obtaining their permission is
>>     equivalent I think of life before Creative Commons when the
>>     solution was to write to the copyright owner for permission to
>>     use the material. It gets very complicated very quickly.
>>     As for the typos and mistakes in the emails,  I don't think that
>>     using [sic] is the solution. I don't know if it is just me but it
>>     seems offensive, especially given the context we are writing in.
>>     I like this idea of a footnote.
>>     Best,
>>     Isabel
>>
>>
>>     ----------
>>     Dra. Isabel Galina Russell
>>     Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas,
>>     Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)
>>     igalina at unam.mx <mailto:igalina at unam.mx>
>>     @igalina
>>
>>
>>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>     *De:* globaloutlookdh-l <globaloutlookdh-l-bounces at uleth.ca
>>     <mailto:globaloutlookdh-l-bounces at uleth.ca>> en nombre de
>>     Bordalejo, Barbara <bab995 at mail.usask.ca
>>     <mailto:bab995 at mail.usask.ca>>
>>     *Enviado:* lunes, 03 de febrero de 2014 11:02 a.m.
>>     *Para:* A list for participants in the ADHO DH Global Outlook
>>     Community
>>     *Asunto:* Re: [globaloutlookDH-l] When citing emails, do people
>>     silently correct typos?
>>     Dear Ernesto,
>>
>>     Although I agree with you on the fundamental point that one
>>     should ask before quoting a listserve post or an e-mail, I am not
>>     sure that I agree with your reasons for that.
>>
>>     We are all aware (or we should be aware) that everything we post,
>>     anywhere on the internet, at any point, could be retrieved by
>>     others. I have suffered the consequences of using irony in a
>>     reply to Humanist, which was then quoted (by a senior scholar) as
>>     if I actually had meant my words literally. Lesson 1: if you are
>>     going to use irony make sure that others are aware of it but
>>     don’t be surprised if someone ends up misinterpreting you.
>>
>>     In the past, irritated by a rude message, I hit reply and send a
>>     very angry answer to a colleague which ended up distributed to a
>>     whole list. Lesson 2: Do not answer professional messages when
>>     angry. If the anger is consuming you, at least, check who the
>>     recipient is before sending.
>>
>>     Many years ago, when I started my MA, the university’s guidelines
>>     suggested not to create an account with a name like “partyanimal”
>>     or “sexything.” I followed the instructions, it was easy as I was
>>     neither of those. However, they forgot to mention that if I ever
>>     signed an online petition to get a desk for Dana Scully, eight
>>     years later my students would still find the long lost site.
>>     Lesson 3: make sure that you are not ashamed of your TV taste or
>>     that you don’t leave a trail of evidence about it.
>>
>>     The fact that Snowden only generated mild discomfort rather than
>>     anger and mass protests, shows that many people consider online
>>     information to be public. I wouldn’t go as far. Not everything
>>     should be public, but in practice many things are.
>>
>>     When I want to make reference to an e-mail, post or even a blog
>>     entry, I contact the author. I don’t do this because I think that
>>     the person should know, I do it because it is good manners and
>>     because I am aware of the composition process of these types of
>>     texts and want to make sure that the person meant what I think he
>>     or she meant.
>>
>>     So we agree, but we have different reasons to think as we do.
>>
>>     BB
>>
>>
>>     On 3 Feb 2014, at 10:40, Ernesto Priego <efpriego at gmail.com
>>     <mailto:efpriego at gmail.com>> wrote:
>>
>>>     Hey Dan,
>>>
>>>     I did not mean to say to that "the default for contributions to
>>>     public scholarly listservs should be considered private", but
>>>     that the way one writes in an email is not the way one would
>>>     write on a public blog post, or a journal article.
>>>
>>>     Not all listservs are alike, and some offer public access to the
>>>     archive, and others don't (the latter require a membership).
>>>
>>>     So I see my replies (that are conversational) between members in
>>>     a given email lsit as precisely in a grey area, where I am not
>>>     necessarily writing with the awareness that I will be cited
>>>     publicly by others. If this happens on places like Twitter,
>>>     where people often get surprised to discover the reach of their
>>>     postings (because they more or less assume, with different
>>>     degrees of self-conciousness, that their postings are public),
>>>     it seems reasonable to me that when one feels one is chatting
>>>     amongst friends then discovering one has been cited publicly
>>>     (making typos for example) could be a reason to be surprised.
>>>
>>>     If one wants to be really strict about it yes, I believe that a
>>>     listserv that will be completely public should contain a terms
>>>     and conditions document stating that members are OK with their
>>>     postings a) being completely public and b) being subject to
>>>     citation, reuse, etc. without previous consent. I am a CC and OA
>>>     advocate so I would be more than happy to subscribe to that; I
>>>     am saying this because I am aware that perhaps this is something
>>>     that not everyone is conscious of (otherwise there wouldn't be
>>>     such panic sometimes when some people discover Facebook's or
>>>     Tumblr's Terms and Conditions for example). Maybe this sounds
>>>     boring and paranoid, but if email is going to be a form of
>>>     publishing we need to start thinking about the ways users are
>>>     expecting to license their postings.
>>>
>>>     When I write these words, for example, I am replying to you,
>>>     Dan, knowing that everyone else in the list will be reading, and
>>>     that the list is the ADHO DH Global Outlook Community. My words
>>>     are addressed to you and the list, and even if in some region of
>>>     my mind I am at the same time aware these words might be read by
>>>     others outside this list, I am always writing for this list.
>>>     Otherwise I would just post it elsewhere; my blog for example.
>>>
>>>     If email listserv postings are going to be subject to research
>>>     by third-parties, then all members need to be aware of that
>>>     their right to confidentiality is being waived. In the majority
>>>     of research surveys, respondents should be fully informed about
>>>     the aims of the survey, and the respondent’s consent to
>>>     participate in the survey must be obtained and recorded.
>>>
>>>     I am also saying this because not all people are equally safe
>>>     when being cited. This means that some scholars can be very
>>>     critical publicly and face little risk, whilst other scholars in
>>>     other settings might be more vulnerable. Often email listservs
>>>     offer a level of confidentiality (even if it is just perceived
>>>     as such) that the open web does not offer (one can feel one is
>>>     chatting in cofindence, amongst friends, even if this is not the
>>>     case and one is going on the record at all times).
>>>
>>>     So I'd say that when it comes to citing what someone said in an
>>>     email (to a listserv or not) it's always better to be safe and
>>>     ask if it's OK to share/cite than sorry... but that's just my
>>>     personal opinion.
>>>
>>>     Best,
>>>
>>>
>>>     *
>>>     *
>>>     *
>>>     Dr Ernesto Priego
>>>     *Lecturer in Library Science
>>>     Acting Course Director, MSc/MA Electronic Publishing, City
>>>     University London *
>>>     *
>>>     City University London offers a wide range of postgraduate
>>>     courses delivered by world-leading academics. Register for our
>>>     Open Evening
>>>     <http://www.city.ac.uk/events/2014/feb/postgraduate-open-evening> on
>>>     Wednesday 19^th February to find out more.
>>>
>>>     MediaCommons' THE NEW EVERYDAY is happy to announce the
>>>     publication of a cluster on
>>>     THE MULTIMODALITY OF COMICS IN EVERYDAY LIFE,
>>>     curated by Ernesto Priego of City University London and David N.
>>>     Wright of Douglas College.
>>>     http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/tne/cluster/multimodality-comics-everyday-life
>>>
>>>     http://epriego.wordpress.com/ @ernestopriego
>>>     <https://twitter.com/ernestopriego>
>>>     Editor-in-Chief, /The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics
>>>     Scholarship**/http://www.comicsgrid.com/
>>>     Subscribe to the Comics Grid Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/iOYAj
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>     On Mon, Feb 3, 2014 at 4:18 PM, Daniel O'Donnell
>>>     <daniel.odonnell at uleth.ca <mailto:daniel.odonnell at uleth.ca>> wrote:
>>>
>>>         Hi Ernesto,
>>>
>>>         I'm really not sure about your privacy paragraph. It seems
>>>         to me difficult to believe that anybody posting to a
>>>         publicly archived list with an open membership could
>>>         understand what they are saying as anything but meant for
>>>         public consumption. Does that mean, for example, that
>>>         Humanist is not a public record since it doesn't explicitly
>>>         say it is? That seems hard to believe, since a lot of
>>>         important things happen there. I'd have thought the same of
>>>         this list.
>>>
>>>         Moreover, it isn't a question of the "list owner" having
>>>         special privileges. Since the records are publicly available
>>>         to anybody on the web, and were distributed to all members
>>>         of the list, anybody in the world can cite anything sent to
>>>         a public email list. There's no additional level of access
>>>         that the owner has on a public list.
>>>
>>>         I can see a couple of places where there might be an
>>>         expectation of privacy or where good manner might cede
>>>         privacy to a public posting.
>>>
>>>         Listservs with a closed archive, for example, might be
>>>         considered prima facie private, especially if the membership
>>>         is restricted and known. It is dangerous for a writer to
>>>         assume that something posted to such a list will remain
>>>         private. But I can certainly see how one might be ethically
>>>         obliged to confirm with the poster before citation. Even
>>>         there, however, the lists I'm on that are really /meant/ to
>>>         be private indicate it: our department list, for example,
>>>         has a header on every message that says the contents of the
>>>         list are to be considered confidential and not to be
>>>         redistributed without prior permission.
>>>
>>>         Even on an open list, it seems to me to be good manners not
>>>         to cite clearly accidental postings--e.g. the kind of
>>>         private messages that people sometimes send to a list in
>>>         error. I don't think the sender can have any expectation
>>>         that a publicly archived message-sent-in-error like that
>>>         will not be cited by anybody; but it seems to me that the
>>>         citer has a duty in that case to check.
>>>
>>>         But for most things on a public list, it seems to me that
>>>         the whole point of the list is to build a kind of gray
>>>         scholarly literature: a lot of our discussions on this list,
>>>         for example, contain discussions that are clearly meant to
>>>         be generalisable and influence debate (like this
>>>         conversation here, for example); others, like announcements,
>>>         cfps, job ads, etc., are clearly meant to be redistributed.
>>>
>>>         Because it exists in a border area between the formal and
>>>         the informal (it is like formal publication in that it is
>>>         available to the community--and probably more widely
>>>         read--but unlike it in that there is no editorial process),
>>>         I think we owe a duty of respect to the people we cite,
>>>         meaning not to be too critical of word choice or minor
>>>         inconsistencies. But I know I've never thought my
>>>         participation on any public scholarly email list (e.g.
>>>         tei-l, humanist, dm-l, digitalclassicist, globaloutlookdh-l)
>>>         was private.
>>>
>>>         Do others feel that the default for contributions to public
>>>         scholarly listservs is that they should be considered
>>>         private? I confess that had never occurred to me before.
>>>
>>>         -dan
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>         On 14-02-03 07:14 AM, Ernesto Priego wrote:
>>>>          It is an interesting question. I suppose some minor typos
>>>>         resulting form typing too fast could be correced
>>>>         "silently". I do these typing mistakes all the time;
>>>>         especially when replying form a mobile phone.
>>>>
>>>>         As for citing emails I would think a related question is
>>>>         equally important, that of privacy. Even for listservs, I
>>>>         assume we are saying some things "in confidence", i.e. we
>>>>         write and send certain things because we are writing them
>>>>         for and sending them to a particuar list which means
>>>>         particular receivers, even when we sometimes don't know who
>>>>         are all the members. It's not the same as when posting
>>>>         openly on Twitter for example, when one assumes it's all
>>>>         public and anyone can read and therefore cite.
>>>>
>>>>         So before citing anything anyone said via email I would
>>>>         check with the sender if it's OK to cite them, unless there
>>>>         are some terms and conditions somewhere that say the owner
>>>>         of the list is entitled to cite any messages sent to the list.
>>>>
>>>>         Best,
>>>>
>>>>         e
>>>>
>>>>         *
>>>>         *
>>>>         *
>>>>         Dr Ernesto Priego
>>>>         *Lecturer in Library Science
>>>>         Acting Course Director, MSc/MA Electronic Publishing, City
>>>>         University London *
>>>>         *
>>>>         City University London offers a wide range of postgraduate
>>>>         courses delivered by world-leading academics. Register for
>>>>         our Open Evening
>>>>         <http://www.city.ac.uk/events/2014/feb/postgraduate-open-evening>
>>>>         on Wednesday 19^th February to find out more.
>>>>
>>>>         MediaCommons' THE NEW EVERYDAY is happy to announce the
>>>>         publication of a cluster on
>>>>         THE MULTIMODALITY OF COMICS IN EVERYDAY LIFE,
>>>>         curated by Ernesto Priego of City University London and
>>>>         David N. Wright of Douglas College.
>>>>         http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/tne/cluster/multimodality-comics-everyday-life
>>>>
>>>>         http://epriego.wordpress.com/ @ernestopriego
>>>>         <https://twitter.com/ernestopriego>
>>>>         Editor-in-Chief, /The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics
>>>>         Scholarship**/http://www.comicsgrid.com/
>>>>         Subscribe to the Comics Grid Newsletter:
>>>>         http://eepurl.com/iOYAj
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>         On Sat, Feb 1, 2014 at 10:20 PM, Daniel O'Donnell
>>>>         <daniel.odonnell at uleth.ca
>>>>         <mailto:daniel.odonnell at uleth.ca>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>             It really is pretty cool, eh?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>             On 14-02-01 02:43 PM, Yasmín S. Portales Machado wrote:
>>>>>             ¡Me encanta esta lista!
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>             Yasmín S. Portales Machado
>>>>>
>>>>>             --------------------------------------
>>>>>
>>>>>             Marxista, Feminista y Bloguera
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>             Twitter: @nimlothdecuba
>>>>>
>>>>>             Facebook http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=663817529
>>>>>
>>>>>             Mi blog: http://yasminsilvia.blogspot.com/
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>             Parte de Proyecto Arcoiris
>>>>>
>>>>>             Colectivo LGBT, anticapitalista e independiente, de Cuba
>>>>>
>>>>>             http://proyectoarcoiris.cubava.cu/
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>             Parte de Observatorio Crítico de Cuba
>>>>>
>>>>>             ¡A la izquierda, pero por la izquierda!
>>>>>
>>>>>             http://observatoriocriticodesdecuba.wordpress.com/
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>             "El feminismo ha puesto en evidencia, mejor que
>>>>>             ninguna otra corriente de pensamiento, tanto la
>>>>>             arbitrariedad del psicoanálisis como la insuficiencia
>>>>>             del marxismo, es decir, ha cuestionado los dos grandes
>>>>>             modelos totalizadores del siglo XX."
>>>>>
>>>>>             Carlo Frabetti
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>             *De:*globaloutlookdh-l
>>>>>             [mailto:globaloutlookdh-l-bounces at uleth.ca] *En nombre
>>>>>             de *Daniel O'Donnell
>>>>>             *Enviado el:* Saturday, February 1, 2014 1:47 PM
>>>>>             *Para:* globaloutlookdh-l at uleth.ca
>>>>>             <mailto:globaloutlookdh-l at uleth.ca>
>>>>>             *Asunto:* Re: [globaloutlookDH-l] When citing emails,
>>>>>             do people silently correct typos?
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>             I like that idea for 3), though I think I'll leave the
>>>>>             explanation in now, because it needs to go through a
>>>>>             press and editors. I confess, I don't even like the
>>>>>             idea of correcting them: that is what email is.
>>>>>
>>>>>             On 14-02-01 11:34 AM, Nishant Shah wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>                 Hey Dan,
>>>>>                 This is a great question, and one that a lot of us
>>>>>                 working with online transcripts and with
>>>>>                 non-standard Englishes constantly face.
>>>>>                 With a collection I was editing, working with
>>>>>                 writers from Asia, Africa and Latin America, where
>>>>>                 the writers were not native speakers and also not
>>>>>                 professionally used to writing, we faced a similar
>>>>>                 dilemma which eventually, we resolved in the
>>>>>                 following ways:
>>>>>                 1. Except for when the syntax was so irregular
>>>>>                 that the citation was unintelligible, we contacted
>>>>>                 the sources and checked if they want to re-write
>>>>>                 it, or if our corrections were still representing
>>>>>                 what they meant.
>>>>>                 2. Like in oral ethnography projects, we retained
>>>>>                 the irregularities of 'written speech', and we
>>>>>                 used that as a precedence for retaining these
>>>>>                 'errors'.
>>>>>                 3. With different registers in the language, we
>>>>>                 retained them without even high-lighting or
>>>>>                 italicising or pointing out those irregularities,
>>>>>                 because that is a judgment call we did not want to
>>>>>                 make, and we also thought that the onus of bias
>>>>>                 was on the reader.
>>>>>                 Hope this helps resolve some of your queries,
>>>>>                 Warm regards
>>>>>                 Nishant
>>>>>                 On 01-02-2014 19:21, Daniel O'Donnell wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>                     I have a question for advice from this group
>>>>>                     that might have political implications.
>>>>>
>>>>>                     In an article I'm about to submit, I cite a
>>>>>                     number of discussions on this list and
>>>>>                     humanist about the use of language, especially
>>>>>                     English. The authors are both native English
>>>>>                     speakers and non-native speakers and, as is
>>>>>                     typical in emails, there are a number of small
>>>>>                     typos. solecisms, and the like.
>>>>>
>>>>>                     Currently, I have a note at the first citation
>>>>>                     indicating that "as is normal in as
>>>>>                     conversational a medium as email
>>>>>                     correspondence, the quoted passages have small
>>>>>                     typographical errors and other solecisms.
>>>>>                     These have not been corrected or otherwise
>>>>>                     noted." My reason for this is that I don't
>>>>>                     want to put in a lot of sic or corrections in
>>>>>                     square brackets. Although I'm a terrible typo
>>>>>                     offender myself, the case can be more
>>>>>                     politicised it seems to me when dealing with
>>>>>                     non-native speakers. I'm uncomfortable acting
>>>>>                     either as judge or, worse, in my case, calling
>>>>>                     attention to "errors"--especially since I
>>>>>                     think they are really more issues of register
>>>>>                     than actual errors.
>>>>>
>>>>>                     I could silently correct them, of course, as
>>>>>                     well, but I don't like that either, in case
>>>>>                     what I think is an obvious correction turns
>>>>>                     out to misrepresent something.
>>>>>
>>>>>                     What do other people think? I've seen /sic/
>>>>>                     used before as a form of ad hominem attack and
>>>>>                     so I generally really hate using it if I can
>>>>>                     avoid it. But since it also seems nuts to
>>>>>                     pepper the correspondence with square brackets
>>>>>                     (and since that could have the same effect as
>>>>>                     a lot of sics), I don't want to do that either.
>>>>>
>>>>>                     Is there a better solution than simply
>>>>>                     flagging the register difference, as I
>>>>>                     currently do?
>>>>>
>>>>>                     -- 
>>>>>
>>>>>                     ---
>>>>>
>>>>>                     Daniel Paul O'Donnell
>>>>>
>>>>>                     Professor of English
>>>>>
>>>>>                     University of Lethbridge
>>>>>
>>>>>                     Lethbridge AB T1K 3M4
>>>>>
>>>>>                     Canada
>>>>>
>>>>>                       
>>>>>
>>>>>                     +1 403 393-2539  <tel:%2B1%20403%20393-2539>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>                     _______________________________________________
>>>>>
>>>>>                     globaloutlookdh-l mailing list
>>>>>
>>>>>                     globaloutlookdh-l at uleth.ca  <mailto:globaloutlookdh-l at uleth.ca>
>>>>>
>>>>>                     http://listserv.uleth.ca/mailman/listinfo/globaloutlookdh-l
>>>>>
>>>>>                       
>>>>>
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>>>>>
>>>>>                       
>>>>>
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>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>                 -- 
>>>>>                 *Dr. Nishant Shah *(Ph.D. Cultural Studies)
>>>>>                 *International Tandem Partner *, Centre for
>>>>>                 Digital Cultures
>>>>>                 <http://www.leuphana.de/en/zentren/cdc.html>Lüneburg,
>>>>>                 Germany
>>>>>                 *Director Research *, The Centre for Internet &
>>>>>                 Society, Bangalore <http://cis-india.org/>
>>>>>                 *Phone*: India: +91-974-007-4884
>>>>>                 <tel:%2B91-974-007-4884>; Germany:
>>>>>                 +49-176-841-660-87 <tel:%2B49-176-841-660-87>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>                 _______________________________________________
>>>>>
>>>>>                 globaloutlookdh-l mailing list
>>>>>
>>>>>                 globaloutlookdh-l at uleth.ca  <mailto:globaloutlookdh-l at uleth.ca>
>>>>>
>>>>>                 http://listserv.uleth.ca/mailman/listinfo/globaloutlookdh-l
>>>>>
>>>>>                   
>>>>>
>>>>>                 You are currently subscribed to this list in NON-digest mode. This means you receive every message as it is posted.
>>>>>
>>>>>                   
>>>>>
>>>>>                 If this represents too much traffic, you can also subscribe in DIGEST mode. This sends out a single email once a day containing the entire day's postings. To change your settings go tohttp://listserv.uleth.ca/mailman/options/globaloutlookdh-l  You can request a password reminder from this page if you have forgotten yours.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>             -- 
>>>>>             ---
>>>>>             Daniel Paul O'Donnell
>>>>>             Professor of English
>>>>>             University of Lethbridge
>>>>>             Lethbridge AB T1K 3M4
>>>>>             Canada
>>>>>               
>>>>>             +1 403 393-2539  <tel:%2B1%20403%20393-2539>
>>>>
>>>>             -- 
>>>>             ---
>>>>             Daniel Paul O'Donnell
>>>>             Professor of English
>>>>             University of Lethbridge
>>>>             Lethbridge AB T1K 3M4
>>>>             Canada
>>>>
>>>>             +1 403 393-2539  <tel:%2B1%20403%20393-2539>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>             _______________________________________________
>>>>             globaloutlookdh-l mailing list
>>>>             globaloutlookdh-l at uleth.ca
>>>>             <mailto:globaloutlookdh-l at uleth.ca>
>>>>             http://listserv.uleth.ca/mailman/listinfo/globaloutlookdh-l
>>>>
>>>>             You are currently subscribed to this list in NON-digest
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>>>>             If this represents too much traffic, you can also
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>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>         -- 
>>>         ---
>>>         Daniel Paul O'Donnell
>>>         Professor of English
>>>         University of Lethbridge
>>>         Lethbridge AB T1K 3M4
>>>         Canada
>>>
>>>         +1 403 393-2539  <tel:%2B1%20403%20393-2539>
>>>
>>>
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-- 
---
Daniel Paul O'Donnell
Professor of English
University of Lethbridge
Lethbridge AB T1K 3M4
Canada

+1 403 393-2539

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