Dear Adeline,<div><br></div><div>Thanks for the &quot;Invisible Australians&quot; example. I too did not quite get the drift of &quot;Postcolonial Digital Humanities&quot; at first. </div><div>I, and possibly Craig too, seemed to think that the term implies that the way you use digital technology is somehow specifically &quot;postcolonial&quot; as compared with a digital resource for the type of history that defines itself as &quot;postcolonial&quot;.</div>
<div><br></div><div>I have produced digital resources in the domain of Buddhist Studies, if I called my work &quot;Buddhist Digital Humanities&quot; would that be helpful?</div><div><br></div><div>Perhaps these problems are tied to the fact that the term DH will soon reach the end of its shelf life. In a world where all information in the Humanities is digital or digitally mediated does it still make sense to speak of DH?</div>
<div><br></div><div>all the best</div><div><br></div><div>marcus<br><div><br></div>-- <br><font color="#999999" size="1">Dr. Marcus Bingenheimer 馬德偉</font><div><font size="1"><font color="#999999">Department of Religion, Temple University</font><br>
</font><div><a href="http://mbingenheimer.net" target="_blank"><font color="#3366ff" size="1">http://mbingenheimer.net</font></a></div></div>
</div>